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How Public Authorities Plotted To Kill Me For Sacrificing To Help My Country

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How Public Authorities Plotted To Kill Me For Sacrificing To Help My Country

While some public authorities are corrupt and inept at their mandates they still want to abuse their power and do whatever it takes to stop concerned citizens from using their own money and talents to help this country, Ghana. I nearly lost my life and below is my story.

I have always been worried about the many land, tribal, and chieftaincy violent and bloody conflicts across the country. Not only that innocent people are killed and properties are destroyed but also the general cost to the nation. This so claimed intractable violent conflicts cost the nation millions of Ghana cedis in management, deployment of police and military for peacekeeping missions. Governments also claim to have been spending millions of Ghana cedis engaging individuals and institutions in peacebuilding activities in these conflicts.

In 2013, the over 100years Alavanyo-Nkonya bloody conflict, located in the northern Volta region became more intense and dangerous again. The violent clashes returned, some people were kidnapped and killed, some people were shot dead and some farms and house were set ablaze. Government, as usual, sent the military and the police to restore calm and the unproductive curfew was re-imposed.

So I was moved by a passionate concern to intervene using my organisation, (YPSA) Youth for Peace and Security Africa, to help the people build a lasting peace to end the conflict. At the time, in 2013, I was 28 years old, and a managing director of a private institution in Eastern Region- Koforidua. I resigned from my well-paying job, emptied my bank savings, and sold my properties so I could continue to fund that intervention to the end of the project. I relocated to the dangerous and ravaged communities of Alavanyo and Nkonya, randomly camping in houses for over a year. Camping in the communities was very central to investigating the bases of the conflict to isolate the many and varied internal and external interests, fear, threats and concerns in the conflict. This was the only way I could build an informed, inhabitant-based, and inclusive roadmap solution to end the conflict. The progress and the successes were unprecedented and that was even acknowledge by the Biakoye District Assembly.

From day one and the beginning of that project, I engaged all the so-called stakeholders. That included The Volta Regional Coordinating Council, The Regional Peace Council, The Hohoe Municipal Assembly, The Biakoye District Assembly, The Chief and Elders of Both Towns, and the Community Members. Though the minister then indicated they were not going to fund the project I was giving them and other relevant institutions, regular reports on the progress of the projects. They were invited to major meetings and conferences during the project, of which the majority they did not attend.

After nine months, so many activities, mobilizing the people into various working associations, groups and committees to perform specific tasks; expanding internal reconciliations to heal victims of the conflict and prepare the minds of the people for a lasting peace; and laying the ground for the commencement of the peace-talk between the two parts, hope for a lasting peace was on the face of many people in the communities.

At this stage I started receiving unwelcoming and inexplicable attitudes from The Volta Regional Minister and some Members of the Ministry and the Volta Regional Peace Council. Though they said they were been embarrassed by the progress and the success of the peace process, and were concerned that they were not getting any credit, it still does not make sense to me. Mind you, during my investigations, I discovered that there are network of people including some invisible public authorities cashing on the conflict, in illegal lumbering, large marijuana farming and trade, and moneys for so called peacekeeping operations.

One day, on my way to a meeting in a community I received a call from unknown number who warned me that on my way to where I was going people were positioned to kill me. I took the warning seriously and returned to my base. The project still continued anyway. Later, I was invited to the Volta regional ministry and met the then minister, the deputy, the director, and other members. I was given a specific instructions to suspend the project with no explanation. They said if it was job I wanted they could help me or if it was conflict I wanted to resolve then I should park and go to Nkwanta-North. I resisted and insisted on continuing the project especially that I was funding the project myself and that did a lot over the nine-month camping there to prepare the people for the peace-talk.

They then started making up stories and destroying me to the military and the police on the ground who I was working with from day one of the project. They made sure the hall we were to use at the Kpando municipal assembly for the peace-talk was cancelled. The unwarranted and unexplainable coordinated attacks from those public authorities became very dangerous and too much for me so in January, 2015 I packed my things and came back to Accra. I have not given up because of these, actually, I have even become more encouraged to work to help my countries from the grip of such corrupt and inept leaders. I still have interest in saving lives and even doing more and expanding. I also want to work and build community schools around the country to deal with the issues of schools-under-trees. We must address this.

Abraham Korbla Klutsey

Source: www.GhanaCNN.com

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I Am Angry, I Am Sad, I Am Pissed – Sam George Weeps Bitterly As He shares His Sad Story

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I Am Angry, I Am Sad, I Am Pissed - Sam George Weeps Bitterly As He shares His Sad Story

GhanaCNN.com has chanced on an article by Honourable Samuel Nartey Goerge on social media platform, Facebook and it reads:

Yesterday evening around 8pm, I got a call and messages from an Assemblyman in my Constituency whilst I was at church that his 12 year old son had been rushed to the Battor Catholic hospital in the morning. The situation had been deteriorating and a decision was made early afternoon to transfer the child to Accra.

Calls were made to Korle Bu Teaching Hospital but they refused to accept the child that there was no bed. Calls were made to 37 Military Hospital and they agreed to take the child. This was about 3pm. Then the next hurdle began. The National Ambulance Service was called to transport the child. Getting the Service was another issue entirely. After getting the service, they insisted that they cannot move the child until they got their own independent confirmation from 37 Military Hospital. For well over 5 hours, they could not get anyone from 37 to confirm.

It was at this point the Assemblyman in desperation called me. I quickly reached out to my Colleague and Brother Samuel Okudzeto Ablakwa who is the MP for the area to see if he could intervene with the Battor Clinic. He immediately called Dr. Atuguba who is the Head of the facility and put me in touch with him. It became clear quickly that Battor had done all they could and it was in the hands of 37 Military Hospital.

Hon. Ablakwa again called a Constituent of his who is a doctor at 37 to see if he could help us. At this point we had finally gotten an ambulance on standby to convey the child. By the time we got a Doctor at 37 to get involved and give the all clear to the ambulance service, the little boy blacked out and could not be resuscitated. He died at 10:05pm.

 

 

Why it would have to take 2 MPs to find a bed for a dying child who needed critical medical care has deprived me of sleep. Why we have ambulances that cannot move because there is no system in place to let them know where to go anger me. Why we have a world-class facility like the University of Ghana Medical Centre with so many empty beds rotting away beats my understanding.

Yet another needless death. Should you know a big man somewhere for you to get the basic necessities? This death has really pained me. It has left me bitter at the system. It has left me angry at the #FixYourself folks. How could the Assemblyman or his 12 year old fix this issue?

The Republic is indeed very sick and needs to be fixed. How much longer can we go on like this. May the soul of this little child whose only crime is to be born Ghanaian rest in the bossom of the LORD.

Source: www.GhanaCNN.com

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Reasons Why Sammy Gyamfi Ignored NPP To Join NDC Finally Revealed – Full Details

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Reason Why Sammy Gyamfi Ignored NPP To Join NDC While He Was A Student At KNUST - Full Details

Samuel Gyamfi, also known as Sammy Gyamfi, is a young, bright lawyer who serves as the communication officer for the largest opposition party, the National Democratic Congress (NDC).

He was born on March 28, 1989. Sammy is from Sunyani in Ghana’s Bono Region, but he has spent almost his entire life in Kumasi.

He attended Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), where he was very active in politics.

Sammy was always around members of the New Patriotic Party (NPP) at KNUST’s Unity hall until he experienced discrimination and intolerance from members of the TESCON group. As a result, he found the NPP unappealing.

He then became a member of the NDC tertiary group TEIN. Sammy won the hearts of several TEIN-NDC KNUST members due to his outspokenness, intelligence, and in-depth political knowledge. He was highly hailed by all.

Sammy Gyamfi rose to become the President of TEIN-NDC KNUST between 2011-2012. His name was known throughout the Ashanti region, prompting the then-Mayor of Kumasi, Mr. Kojo Bonsu, to appoint him as the spokesperson and public relations officer for the Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly (KMA) between 2012-2016.

Source: www.GhanaCNN.com

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Get A New or Replaced NHIS Card By Doing The Following

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Get A New or Replaced NHIS Card By Doing The Following

The Ghanaian government established the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in 2003. The program is a type of national health insurance that was established to provide Ghanaians with equitable access and financial coverage for basic health care services.

Former President John Agyekum Kuffour’s name will live on in history as the president who brought Ghana’s dream to fruition.

If a person’s NHIS card is lost, he or she must go to one of the organization’s regional or district offices.

When a Ghanaian loses his or her NHIS card or wants to make a new one, he or she can replace it by doing the following.

For new or replacement of your card:

  • Contact the district office or NHIS agent at NHIS Office in your district. 
  • Fill a new applicant form or replacement form and pay the processing fee where applicable.
  • You will be issued a new ID card.

Source: www.GhanaCNN.com

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